SoCal PhotoExchange

Pentax Spotmeter V – User Report

Posted in Camera equipment, Photo techniques, Photography by douglaspstockdale on February 7, 2018

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Pentax Spotmeter V 2017 copyright Douglas Stockdale

For my analog/film photography, I have been a long time user of spotmeters, my first was made by Soligor and when I dropped that too many times, I replaced it with the Pentax Spotmeter V. The Spotmeter V is an analog spotmeter that has since been replaced by Pentax with a digital version. The meter will measure the luminescence of a very precise area of the subject designed by a round spot much like a bullseye within the meter.

What brought me to use this precise light meter tool was my introduction into the zone system many, many years ago. In a future article I will discuss the zone system in more detail, suffice to say when using black & white film that was hand developed, there were a number of film processing tricks a photographer could use. This was predicated on the fact that they knew the lighting conditions of their subject and what the black & white values that they wanted in the resulting print. The secret trick to make this happened depended a lot on using a spot meter that could record exact light readings in various places within the subject; from the lightest values, mid values to the darkest values.

One thing that I did not like about the lesser expensive Soligor spotmeter was the undersized handle grip, which was rather annoying and maybe a reason that I dropped this delicate instrument one too many times. The Pentax in turn has a large handle and from that perspective alone is a delight to use. You can really get a grip on this little beauty.

The second was the Soligor had a two phase scale; you had one set of values with a slight squeeze of the button and if needed a different sensitivity, you squeezed a little harder to get the second set of light values. In comparison the Pentax has one continuous scale within the view finder, which is much easier to use, especially if the light values were in the mid point of the scale that for the Soligor had the readout jumping between the two values and a bit confusing to know exactly what was going on.

To use this spotmeter requires the photographer to take the value(s) viewed inside the meter and then translate it to the rotating scale on the outside of the meter, see below, to determine the required camera settings. As example, if reading a gray card (19% gray) and the meter pointed to the value of 10 & 1/2, you moved the dial to point at the 10-1/2 mark and for an ISO 100 film, you could chose a series of exposures that provide you with an appropriately exposed film (e.g. 1/15 sec at the half click between f/8 and f/11).

The final luminescence value determined for the mid-point is called the exposure index (EI) and when using the older Hassleblad lens, there is a corresponding EI scale on the lens. Thus this meter and lens make a great combination. When the EI is set on the lens, the aperture and shutter speed sequences were coupled together and locked in. A change in the aperture created a corresponding change to the exposure time. Thus a photographer could make one exposure and then quickly change the coupled exposure index settings for a different combination and still have the desired film exposure.

Although I no longer hand-process my film, I still depend on this meter to evaluate the lighting of my subject and then determine what my exposure should be.

This Pentax Spotmeter V has been a work-horse for me and has provided me without any troubles for the past ten plus years.

Cheers!

Pentax_Spotmeter_V_exposure_dial

Really Right Stuff ball-head system – User report

Posted in Photo techniques, Photography by douglaspstockdale on February 1, 2018

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Really Right Stuff BH-40 and mounting plate with Hasselblad 2017 copyright Douglas Stockale

The review of the Really Right Stuff (RRS) ball-head system is the second part of my series on tripod systems and last week I discussed the Gitzo carbon-fiber tripods. To create a really good camera support platform, you need to use equal parts tripod and the means to hold and position the camera system. While the tripod provides the basic support I have found that a well design tripod head can make the photographic experience a lot of fun or if not well designed it can be a lot of frustration. Having used a both a ball-head and a pan-head, I do really, really do prefer the ball-head system for the following reasons.

First, I will admit that the pan-head systems have come a long way since I purchased my all-in-one tripod that included a pan-head camera mount. From my discussions with other photographers the pan-head seems better suited for those who need precision and are not in any big hurry, such as architectural field work. Essentially you have three levers to control changes; for the vertical, horizontal and tilt. I just found it frustrating to use a pan-head as a change to one of the three levers usually entailed adjusting the other two, which is why you better not be under a time constraint.

Since my field work is usually more dynamic and after frequent struggling with a pan-head I made the change to a ball-head support system and I am glad I did. I can vouch for all of the comments that I read about the Magnum photographers almost elusively using a ball-heads as I now realize that a ball-head makes a ton of sense. Set up is fast. And faster still if the ball-head is smooth as silk in operation.

After a lot of checking and reading reviews I concluded that the camera support system made by Really Right Stuff (RRS) was my choice, although a bit more pricey, these are made by a US machine shop which is run by photographers. They have created a really nice market niche and in my book have shown that they can create one of the best ball-heads in the market that is made in the US. Lots and lots of precise metal machining going on.

I acquired the middle of the line PH-40 which is predicated on the weight of the camera system, with the BH-55 meant for the really heavy cameras, e.g. a load view camera or DSLRs with some really long lens. RRS also has some lighter and more compact ball-heads as well. At the time I bought this ball-head I still had my Mamyia RB-67 with the prism, which is a heavy beast (since changed to the Hasselblad system) and a bunch of digital cameras including a full-frame DSLR.

The ball-head weight issue for long lens (my longest zoom is the Canon 70-200 mm f/4 L lens) is with all of that heavy glass hanging out at the end of the lens acts like a big gravity lever that can result in ball-head creep. This occurs once you lock the ball-head down for your composition (or a pan-head), there might be a tiny bit of moment in the camera/lens due to the amount of static weight being placed on it. Even with the relatively light 70-200 on my Canon, I still recheck the composition before committing to the exposure.

Although the ball head comes with a threaded screw, what makes this system work even slicker is when you pair a ball-head up with a quick release system. This also requires a matching mounting plate dedicated to the camera base. In my case I opted for a lever quick release base mounted to the ball-head and I have not had any issues with snagging this lever and inadvertently having the camera come off. The design of the lever does require some force to engage it, thus it does take some effort to open and close so a slight brush with your clothes is not going to allow a catastrophe to occur. For a square format camera like the Hasselblad a simple bottom quick-release plate will suffice, see above.

For a DSLR with a rectangle format, I would recommend acquiring an L bracket (see below) that once the camera is locked down for the composition, the camera body can be quickly changed to for an alternative framing. Although an L bracket does add a bit more weight to potentially an already heavy camera such as the Canon 5DMk3, I have found that the L bracket weight actually seems to act as a counter balance to the battery and hand hold aspects of most digital camera systems. The camera as a whole now seems more balanced and for hand holding situations, the horizontal framing process seems quicker now. Maybe it’s just me, but I get similar comments from other photographers when they pick up my rig.

I will be honest; the majority of my work is with horizontal framing, but when I wanted a quick vertical framing after the camera was set-up, it was lightening fast to change the body and quickly get the exposure. When you are working with a fluid situation, the amount of time to make a camera change can also make the difference in getting the alternative shot.

My one gripe; the quick release plate does include a leveling bubble, but this bubble is concealed when the camera is on the ball-head. If for an architectural composition in which the horizon and verticals need to be in alignment this would require removing the camera body and checking the bubble or setting up the tripod and get the bubble right before mounting the camera body. My work around for speed? I purchased an inexpensive bubble that slides into the flash bracket of my DSLR (regretfully not shown below).

All in all I have now used the RRS BH-40 for over five years through the US, Europe and Asia. It easily dismounts from the tripod to reduce size for travel and is an absolute delight to use; very, very smooth operation. It is really great that when you are engaged with a subject that you don’t find yourself worrying about your support equipment and it essentially becomes an extension of your creative imagination.

It’s also my option that Really Right Stuff is the top of the line for ball-heads systems. Not the most inexpensive system, but you only need to buy it once and you should consider this a valuable investment in obtaining great photographs.

Cheers!

RRS BH-40 ball-head with Canon 5DMark3

Gitzo compact carbon fiber tripod: user report

Posted in Camera equipment, Photo techniques, Photography by douglaspstockdale on January 24, 2018

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Gitzo G1228 Mountaineer Reporter Carbon Fiber Tripod, copyright Douglas Stockdale

A number of years ago when I bent and broke for the last time my aluminum tubing heavy duty tripod, I decided to make an investment in a carbon fiber tripod. One of my many reasons for selecting the Gitzo G1228 as the tripod’s name implies it that it’s meant for backpacking and mountaineering; rugged and light weight. The carbon fiber materials were very much lighter than the beast that I had before and every bit as rigid and has held up very well over time which is the reason for this user report. By the way the current Gitzo model is the G1228 MK2.

My intent was to use if for my DSLR and medium format cameras with light to moderate weight lens. I understand from others that this tripod can probably handle a light weigh 4×5″ camera as well. I was also intending to travel with it on airline flights and when the ball head is removed, the tripod collapses and measures 20 1/2″ which is ideal for stuffing in an overhead bag that fits in the overhead bin. I have since carried this tripod with me on assignments all over the US, as well as to Europe and Asia. No issues.

The downside to this compact travel size tripod is that when the four section legs are fully extended as well as the column fully extended my camera is almost the right height for eye level viewing. The less you can extend the tripod legs usually the greater its stability, which is the whole reason for its use. So when I using this tripod with my camera rig, such as in both the photos, I try not to extend the column if the composition appears to work. I have also found that when the three legs are held together, the tripod can double as a monopod and provides just enough added stability when working with an active situation (perhaps looks a bit weird, but it works).

The legs are secured or extended after a quick twist of the heavy duty locking rings and I prefer this over the flip-tap type leg systems. It seems that the flip-tabs keep getting snagged (not great for packing with clothes) and are always in the wrong place. The leg sections always seem to extend quickly and smoothly.

Since I am a big fan of ball-heads to attach the camera to the tripod, having the option of a plate to attach the head design of your preference was a nice feature. This also allows a more compact size for travel when I remove the ball head.

The Gitzo is very stream line and robust and has done by me very well for the past five years.There was a hook that threaded on the bottom of the column, but I seemed to have lost that a while ago. If you can keep track of your hook, that is idea place to attach a bag or some other object to provide additional stability for the tripod, such as on a breezy day.

With a lot of my travel assignments now by car/SUV, I am considering a longer tripod. I would prefer that I do not need to extend the smallest legs and still have my cameras at eye level. I would also buy another Gitzo again when I am back in the market for another tripod; little pricey, but worth it.

Cheers!

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The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion

Posted in Photo Art Business, Photo techniques, Photo Workshops, Photography by douglaspstockdale on October 18, 2017

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Maria Piscopo – The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion

Publisher: Allworth Press (NY), Fifth Edition, copyright 2016

While developing my Marketing Your Photo Book workshop for LACP (Note: this one-day workshop has space available, Oct 29th, at LACP) I came across Maria Piscopo’s The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion. Since this title was in its fifth edition I figured that this book has stood the test of time and photographer have kept buying it and thus might be worth checking out. What I anticipated was this is a generalist guide for a broad spectrum of photographers, not specific to the needs of artist and photographers who were marketing a small niche product like a self-published book.

My background includes graduate level marketing classes that was part of my focus while I was getting my M.B.A.  Since that course work was even more general maybe Piscopo’s book might help with some photographic market specifics that I might not be aware of. Last, this might make an interesting reference book for those attending my workshop.

Well it turns out that Maria Piscopo’s book is intended entirely for professional photographers while the fine art market is treated as a side-line and provided a short chapter in the back of the book. I had expected a little better organization of the content, but at least many of the parts for a Marketing program appear to be present.

Much of this book is about the very business basics (and I do mean basics) of professional photography; business licenses, business ethics, getting organized, using a computer (e.g. bookkeeping), and an introduction to how to use the internet for event, wedding, and commercial. Writing a Marketing plan does not occur until almost the end of the book, something I might think would be the first thing to consider for a Marketing book. Which is to say, this book is not a very good guide for Marketing and you might be better off with a college basic Marketing text book.

If on the other hand you are very new to having your own business and have not done this before,  yet you think you might want to be a professional photographer, this book might be of some help to make sure you have most of your business bases covered. This will not be a reference book for my Book Marketing workshop and not to say that occasionally there are some little gems buried in the book, just finding these can be more frustrating that what it is worth to me. It might be ideal for you.

Best regards,

Douglas Stockdale

Portfolio Reviewer for LACP

Posted in Juried opportunities, Photo Art Business, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on August 5, 2017

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Dawn Watson, dnj Gallery, Santa Monica, CA copyright 2017 Douglas Stockdale

This last month I was a guest portfolio reviewer for the LACP (Los Angeles Center of Photography) EXPOSURE 2017 portfolio reviews at the dnj Gallery in Santa Monica’s Bergamont (Arts) Station.

Overall it was a great experience as a portfolio reviewer as I was introduced to some very intriguing and well thought out photographic projects. It should probably come as no surprise that many of the photographers and artists were interested in spending time with me regarding my assessment about these projects being published.

One of the most frequent questions I am asked before one of these events; how does one prepare for a portfolio review? Since the review is scheduled for only 20 minutes, everyone is always surprised in how quickly this time slips by. First just about everyone brings too many photographs and supporting materials probably in the hopes that a reviewer will be able to see it all and still have time to provide some wise advice. Nope that usually does NOT happen.

Second, as a portfolio reviewer I start each discussion with three requests: tell me about yourself, tell me about the portfolio we are going to review and what is it you would like to obtain feedback from me about your project that might help you to move it forward?

Reviewers would like to know a little bit about who they are talking to; not your life story, but a quick 2 minute bio, which I call an elevator speech. Same for the portfolio (maybe a photographic project), for the photographer/artist to provide some context as to what is going to be reviewed, again perhaps 1-2 minutes, another elevator speech. Last, what is it you need from the review? Some examples: feedback on the editing of the photographs, are the images technically acceptable, could this sequence or series work in a book layout, are the photographs consistent with the artistic statement, etc.

Third, plan on reviewing only one portfolio with each reviewer, you can bring more portfolios, but you will only have real quality time to spend on one with each reviewer. In most portfolio reviews the artist/photographer might be meeting with a series of different portfolio reviewers and it is appropriate to select a portfolio that is relevant to a specific reviewer. In my case, most wanted me to review their book dummy’s or portfolios that they were thinking about having published.

Fourth, plan on having less than 15 prints in the portfolio to have reviewed. In many cases we did not get through all 15 prints during our 20 minute session. You should want quality time/discussion for each image and how these images relate to each other. This exchange takes time when it results in a give and take discussion.

Bring something to take notes and one photographer recorded our review session. Each portfolio reviewer is an individual with a point of view, which may be very different from yours, so don’t become defensive if the reviewer does not see or understand what you are trying to communicate with your photographic prints. One key purpose of coming to a portfolio review is to get a broader exposure to your work and have others talk about what they see. If you are doing more talking than listening, then you are not going to obtain the full benefit of this occasion.

Last, leave something behind, perhaps as simple as a business card (yes, one person left me with one of their books) to help the reviewer remember who you are (I did 12 portfolio reviews on Saturday and names and projects began to blur at the end of the day) and then follow up with a nice email note a couple of days after the event.

Reviewers are there to help you and if they can point you in a direction or make an follow on introduction, they usually will. I had a short list of introductions and follow-up items that I had promised and these are just about completed, as it takes a few days to get organized. Also realized that these are good events to network with the other photographers and artist who are participating in the reviews as you never can tell what might come up during a side discussion.

Note: I had not realized at the time I took the photograph of Dawn Watson, above, that the large red photograph behind me was going to reflect so much pink color on Watson’s self-published book. Below is a better representation of her book “Trees” ( & thanks to Watson for providing a better photograph) and a nice follow-up email regarding our review time together. well done.

Cheers!

Douglas Stockdale, Publisher

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Gerhard Clausing takes over as Editor of The SoCal Photo Exchange

Posted in Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on August 3, 2017

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Gerhard Clausing, Bodyscapes, copyright 2016

I am very excited to announce that Gerhard “Gerry” Clausing is the new Editor of The SoCal Photo Exchange. This is an on-line journal which covers photographic events, exhibitions and other news in Southern California. Previously Clausing was a Contributing Writer while recently functioning as the acting-Editor for this photo-blog in conjunction with being the Associate Editor of the The PhotoBook Journal.

I am looking forward to his leadership of this photographic venue as a site to capture the diversity of the Southern California photographic community. I have enjoyed collaborating with him as we have participated in photographic workshops, and covered the LA Art Book Fair, Photo Independent and now anticipating the Medium Festival in San Diego.

Please join me in welcoming Gerry to this well-deserved position.

Cheers!

Douglas Stockdale

Publisher & Founder (2008), The SoCal Photo Exchange

About Gerhard Clausing; with a Ph.D. in linguistics and literature from UC Berkeley and a career as tenured USC professor with numerous publications behind him, he is now happy to concentrate on his visual adventures. He studied at Otis, Brooks, and the Los Angeles Center of Photography (LACP) and has been featured on Lenscratch, Blur Magazine, Black&White Magazine, Le Journal de la Photographie, Black and White Spider Awards, Houghton Mifflin. He has exhibited at LACP, dnj Gallery (Santa Monica, CA), PhotoPlace Gallery (Vermont), Kiernan Gallery, Julia Dean Gallery (Venice and Hollywood), Perfect Exposure Gallery (Los Angeles), Irvine Fine Arts Center (Irvine, CA), and Art Basel Miami, among others.​ He is the Associate Editor of the The PhotoBook Journal.

About The Photographers Exchange; an informal organization of creative photographers who meet at the Irvine Fine Arts Center (Irvine, CA) on the third Thursday of each month at 6:30 pm. Participants can bring up to five pieces of work for presentation and evaluation by the group. The organization is open to all photographers and artist who would like to participate.

Bodyscapes, copyright 2016

Unself Selfie

Interview: Michael Weitzman – CollectorWorks

Posted in Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on June 5, 2017

AyeCalypso

Photographs copyright Michael Weitzman

This is the second of a series of interviews of photographers who are or have been members of The Photographers Exchange, a group of photographers and artist that meets monthly at the Irvine Fine Arts Center (IFAC). Michael Weitzman has been regularly featured on YourDailyPhotograph and has recently become represented by CollectorWorks. This interview was about that transition. Previously we interviewed Jim McKinniss on his similar transition to be represented by CollectorWorks.

Editor, Douglas Stockdale (TPE): Michael thank you, we appreciate the opportunity to discuss your photographic background and what led you to become part of Daniel Miller’s CollectorWorks (CW). Since each of you have a diverse style, perhaps it would be a good start if you could describe what you photograph and how you then process that imagery?

Michael Weitzman (MW) I typically shoot with plastic and lo-fi cameras, which enables my imagination to roam freely seeking new narratives from the mundane and often overlooked subjects. I enjoy immensely the handmade print utilizing a variety of traditional and alternative processes.

TPE: One of the common threads for this series of photographer interviews is that each of you has a shared background of being part of The Photographers Exchange. How did participating in The Photographers Exchange monthly meetings prepare you for being included in CollectorWorks?

MW: The Photographers Exchange is a great forum to showcase your work and get feedback and ideas from a good cross section of artists. It also pushed me to not be a “one trick pony”.

TPE: What was the process that eventually led to being included in the CW? If I recall, you have been featured somewhat regularly on YourDailyPhotograph (YDP) prior to this.

MW: Credit is due to fellow member Jim McKinniss. Jim attended a group exhibition that had three of my photogravures. He approached me and said you should talk to Daniel Miller or at least sign up for YDP. Miller just might be interested. The rest is history.

TPE: Miller has been quoted as saying that he has a particular following and has a great idea of what will sell and what will not. Have you found that to be the case as well for the photographs you have had featured and sold?

MW: My first photo sale was from a “lith” print on YDP. I decided to hand deliver it and meet Miller. We had a good exchange and I left with the impression of the old APPLE Computer term “Think Different”. Subsequently, I have sold several photographs, mostly alternative processed either through YDP or CW.

TPE: It would appear that the CW is a virtual gallery, does Daniel Miller have any of your photographs in his inventory or is this truly a virtual gallery?

MW: Miller maintains an inventory of my photographs and occasionally will exhibit them along with others from CW at his Duncan Miller Gallery in Santa Monica.

TPE: As a result of being represented what other opportunities has this opened up for you?

MW: Lots of exposure, networking, and sales. For 2017 I was part of PHOTO L.A. and had the honor to present my work in front of many collectors and gallery owners. The energy and buzz was amazing !

TPE: What are the next steps that you now intend to take as a result of this representation?

MW: I’m thinking a book. The beauty of having my images presented thematically or as a story is very appealing to me.

TPE: If a photographer was interested in being represented by CollectorWorks, which recommendations would you offer?

MW: Find photographers, painters, sculptors, musicians that you admire and respect. Look at their work, study them. Rinse and repeat. Do work from the heart whatever that might be. Quoting Miles Davis “Sometimes you have to play a long time to be able to play like yourself”

TPE: Thank you, it was a pleasure to discuss this with you and we are wishing you success as you continue your creative endeavors.

MW: Doug, thank you very much for the opportunity. It was a pleasure.

BadMoonRising

giddy-up

HeyJoe

MummersDance

svelte

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Interview: Jim McKinniss – CollectorWorks

Posted in Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on June 1, 2017

Man in Black with Balloons Birds and Sphere

Photographs copyright Jim McKinniss

This is the first of a series of interviews of photographers who are or have been members of The Photographers Exchange. Jim McKinniss has been regularly featured on YourDailyPhotograph and has recently become represented by CollectorWorks. This interview was about that transition.

Editor, Douglas Stockdale (TPE): Thank you Jim, we appreciate the opportunity to discuss your photographic background and what led you to become part of Daniel Miller’s CollectorWorks. Since each of you have a diverse style, perhaps it would be a good start if you could describe what you photograph and how you then process that imagery?

Jim McKinniss (JM) Hello Doug. I have a rather eclectic portfolio of photographs. My current and past projects include a ten year project revolving around the annual Mask Festival in Venice, Italy,  the Los Angeles Metro,  Nudes in the landscape of the Badlands of South Dakota, Horses and the farmland around Santa Maria, CA where I currently live.

I make heavy use of Photoshop to do traditional wet darkroom type edits. For many of my photographs I will use texture layers to enhance images.

TPE: One of the common threads for this series of photographer interviews is that each of you has a shared background of being part of The Photographers Exchange. How did participating in The Photographers Exchange monthly meetings prepare you for being included in CollectorWorks?

JM: When I first began seriously making  photos about 12 years ago I attended my first Photographers Exchange meeting. In those meetings I saw a lot of great photography and participated in the friendly exchanges  about photography between members . I had the opportunity to see and discuss photos each month. I learned a lot about composition, printing, alternative ways of processing photos. Most importantly I learned how to read photographs and appreciate the artistic expression the members gave to their photos.

TPE: What was the process that eventually led to being included in the CollectorWorks? If I recall, you have been featured somewhat regularly on YourDailyPhotograph.com (YDP) prior to this.

JM: I met Daniel Miller a number of years ago when I visited his original gallery on Venice Blvd. in Los Angeles. Somehow that led me to subscribe to YDP. Through that  connection I found out that Daniel was was offering a free portfolio review. That was about 3 years ago.

I went to the review and at the end Daniel asked me to submit 6 of my images to YDP. Since then I have had my photos shown in 13 issues of YDP and have sold several photos through that exposure. Subsequently Daniel offered to represent my work through CollectorWorks.

TPE: Daniel Miller has been quoted as saying that he has a particular following and has a great idea of what will sell and what will not. Have you found that to be the case as well for the photographs you have had featured and which of these were the genre of images that sold?

JM: As I said, I have sold several of my photos through YDP. Since the work I submit covers a wide range of genre there is no specific one that I can point to as being the most popular with collectors.

Daniel definitely knows his collector base and is very aware of what they are interested in collecting. More than that Daniel travels, mostly to France I think, to art exhibitions to keep abreast of the status of the photography market.

TPE: It would appear that the ColllectorWorks is a virtual gallery, does Daniel Miller have any of your photographs in his inventory or is this truly a virtual gallery?

JM: It is a virtual gallery.

TPE: As a result of being represented by CollectorWorks what other opportunities has this opened up for you?

JM: CollectorWorks is only a few months old and I haven’t seen related opportunities arise as yet.

TPE: What are the next steps that you now intend to take as a result of this representation?

JM: Daniel Miller and CollectorWorks are the first  to offer representation of my work. I use that representation as part of my bio and for interview articles.  At this point I have not gone farther because of my travel schedule.

TPE: If a photographer was interested in being represented by CollectorWorks, which recommendations would you offer?

JM: Start by submitting photos to YDP.

TPE: Thank you, it was a pleasure to discuss this with you and we are wishing you success as you continue your creative endeavors.

JM: Thank you very much for your interest in my work and experiences Doug.

Tammy and Alex 2013-09-01 #4

Jaime 2012-12-04 #28

Rochelle 2008-05-23 #12

Denise 2008-05-23#14

Rain in Venice #4

LACP portfolio reviews – EXPOSURE 2017

Posted in Photo Art Business, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on May 13, 2017

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Gerhard Clausing’s portfolio, EXPOSURE 2016, copyright 2016 Douglas Stockdale

LACP (Los Angeles Center for Photography) has just announced the dates for EXPOSURE 2017, their three day portfolio review event. I am very honored to be among a diverse and broad group of portfolio reviewers again this year. Similar to last year, I will be providing portfolio reviews on Sunday, July 16th, from 9:30 to 5:00 pm at the dnj gallery in Bergamont Station, Santa Monica (CA).

These portfolio reviews are always great events to network and have your work seen and discussed. As a reviewer, I have found this to be a wonderful opportunity to hear and see photographic projects that are in the various stages of development. As a networking event, myself included, a chance to meet up with reviewers, make a stronger personal relationship and as importantly, network with fellow photographers in between sessions. As you might imagine, I am very intrigued with portfolio’s that are intended to become photographic books.

Dates & Places:

Friday, July 14, 9:30 am – 5 pm (at LACP facilities, Los Angeles, CA)

Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16, 9:30 am – 5 pm (at dnj Gallery, Bergamont Station, Santa Monica, CA)

Early bird registration!

Early Bird Pricing (ends June 7, 2017)
$475 ($450 Members) for 8 reviews
$325 ($300 Members) for 5 reviews

Regular Pricing (after June 7, 2017)
$500 ($475 Members) for 8 reviews
$350 ($325 Members) for 5 reviews

Reviewers include (besides your truly):

Elizabeth Avedon, Curator and Contributor, L’Oeil de la Photographie
Sherrie Berger, Photo Consultant
Rudi Bianchi, Photo Collector
Jonathan Blaustein, Writer and Contributor, NYTimes Lensblog and Photo Editor
Susan Burnstine, Contributor, B+W Magazine (UK)
Marisa Caicholo, Curator, Building Bridges Art Exchange, Casablanca Biennale
Kai Caemmerer, Curator, SFO Museum
Brittany Cernansky*, Art Producer, Saatchi & Saatchi
Brian Paul Clamp, Director, Clamp Art
Shana Nys Dambrot, Art Critic and Curator, Art Share LA Board Member
Crista Dix, Founder and Director of wall space gallery
Emily Gonzalez-Jarrett, Curatorial Associate, Hammer Museum
Nick Haymes, Owner/Director, Little Big Man Gallery
Pamela Hassell, Photo Editor, Associated Press
Maiza Hixson, Curator and Co-Director of Santa Barbara CAST
Sarah Lee, Independent Curator
Kaycee Olsen, Director, Kopeikin Gallery
Eve Schillo*, Curatorial Assistant, Photo Department, LACMA
Gabrielle Sirkin, Freelance Photo Editor, AirB&B magazine
Aline Smithson, Founder/Editor Lenscratch.com
Douglas Stockdale, Founder/Editor of The PhotoBook journal
Heather Strobo, Curator, The Porch Gallery
Joanna Szupinska-Myers, Curator of Exhibitions, CA Museum of Photography
Paula Tognarelli, Executive Director, Griffin Museum of Photography

My friend Sarah Hadley will be providing a FREE LACP portfolio review prep talk on June 14th. So if you have not participated in a portfolio review before or it has been a while since you last participated and need a “rust remover”, a great discussion about what to do and as important, what not to do, for a portfolio review session. The review sessions are relatively brief, 20 minutes, and time flies by fast, so you want to make a lasting impression and being prepared with your portfolio, the “leave-behind” and a short rehearsal of your “elevator speech” will be well served.

I am looking forward to seeing you there!

Cheers,

Douglas Stockdale

Two Current Exhibits – Laguna Art Museum and LACMA

Posted in Art Museums, Uncategorized by Gerhard Clausing on May 5, 2017

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Wanted to call your attention to two interesting current exhibits:

The Laguna (Beach) Art Museum is featuring an extensive exhibit on the California School of Fine Arts’ first decade (now San Francisco Art Institute). Includes work by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and many others. Only through May 29. Some work by Hurrell is also on exhibit in a separate section. Saw it yesterday, well worth it!

Also, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), an extensive exhibit on Moholy-Nagy, through June 18.

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