SoCal PhotoExchange

Survey of Contemporary Landscape

Posted in Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on September 10, 2018

DianeReeves_Pyramid Nevada

Diane Reeves, Pyramid, Nevada

The investigation and image capture of the landscape dates back to the earliest photographs made by a camera in 1826 by Joseph Nicephore Niepce and the landscape still remains as one of the classic photographic genres.

Photographers have romanticized the landscape as part of the Pictorialist movement in the early 1900’s and incorporated it into the Modernist movement of the f/64 group in the 1940’s through the late 1960’s. The landscape photograph evolved with the Conceptual art movement, harking back to the New Topographics exhibition in 1975 at the George Eastman House exhibition. Today landscape photographs have become ubiquitous, either in the multitude of family vacations or the documentation of the surrounding urban/rural environments posted on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr or other social media.

The images in Contemporary Landscape in this on-line exhibition are a broad investigation of the myriad ways in which we investigate the landscape through art and photography. It is a photographic survey of current landscape practices; whether investigating “classic” unadorned nature or the gritty urban landscape, as an abstract concept or a straight rendition while being created using digital capture, analog/film, digital manipulation or in combination with other medium and artistic expressions.

The 13 artist/photographers in this exhibition include: Paul Anderson, Jan Brueckner, Ellen Butler, Frank Cancian, Gerhard “Gerry” Clausing, Jim McKinniss, Jim Koch, Stan Kuran, Janos Lanyi, Scott Mathews, Marc Plouffe, Diane Reeves, Douglas Stockdale.

Cheers!

Douglas Stockdale, Exhibition Curator

Survey of Contemporary Landscape

Paul Anderson

Anderson_Paul_Vibrant_City_3

Anderson_Paul_Density_1

Jan Brueckner

Jan_Brueckner landscape 3

Ellen Butler

Butler_Ellen_3

Butler_Ellen_2

Frank Cancian

Cancian_Frank_intersection_1

Gerhard “Gerry” Clausing

Clausing_Gerhard_Levitation_ 2

Clausing_Gerhard_Hesitation_3

Jim McKinniss

Jim McKinniss_Sphere on the Road Ahead

Jim McKinniss_RV Park After the Apocalypse #2

Jim Koch

Koch_Jim_Untitled_ 3

Koch_Jim_Untitled_1

Stan Kuran

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kuran_Stan_L.A. Reflections_3

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Janos Lanyi

Lanyi_Janos_2

Lanyi_Janos_1

Scott Mathews

Scott_Mathews_in_the_forest

Scott_Mathews_bisti_eggs

Marc Plouffe

Marc_Plouffe_Buried_Alive_4

Marc_Plouffe_Palm_&_Sign_2

Diane Reeves

DianeReeves_Rhyolite

Douglas Stockdale

Douglas_Stockdale_America

Douglas_Stockdale_San_Diego_Port_of_Entry

Expired film – creative opportunities

Posted in Photo techniques, Photography by douglaspstockdale on March 4, 2018

02-06-18_Gardening_for_Ordnance_74660010_Arroyo_Trabuco

Untitled (Gardening for Ordnance) 2018 copyright Douglas Stockdale

About four years ago a friend gifted me a couple blocks of expired 120 roll film for my Hasselblad camera; some Ilford Pan F black&white film that expired in June of 1984, Ilford HP5 black&white film that expired in July of 1982 and a 20 pack of FujiChrome Provia 100F daylight transparency film that expired in October 2006. What most photographers had drilled into their heads by the various film companies in the pre-digital years is that expired film is in danger of color shifts and should NOT be used. The dire warnings from the film companies implied that not storing film in a refrigerated was fraught with professional danger. Of course, if any film did expire, the photographer was assumed to want to replace it, thus ensuring a steady sales of “fresh” film.

Which for my memory projects, the idea that a film might have a serendipitous color shift as a result of being expired is actually something I am hoping for. (yes, in the mean time, I have become the repository of expired 120 film among my friends for some odd reason).

For my project Gardening for Ordnance (did I mention I live on a decommissioned WWII practice bombing range?) I chose the FijiChrome as my intended color medium. Perhaps the 12 years of addition aging of my 120 film would yield some unexpected results that might induce some visual metaphors? I think that my buddy Sandy had properly stored this film he donated because so far, no real color shifts that I can detect in either the processed transparencies or in my scan files. The scan of the unaltered transparency below includes the gray card, while the image above has been tweaked with an adjustment layer for some curve modifications (slight s curve).

So could using expired film add another dimension to a creative project? I think so, but so far for this 12 year overripe block of film, regretfully not yet. Although I am now tempted to hold on to this film for a little bit longer, I think that this expired film is suitable for this current project and adds a subtle dimension to my narrative. I will use what I need for now and if any of this film is left over from this project, all the better for another day and project.

Now I am worried about my 36 year old expired black&white film, will it be uneventful as well??

Technical Notes: 120mm Zeiss Makro-Planar CF on Hasselblad 503cx, exposure 1/125th at f/5.6 (EV 12), film normal commercial development (E6).

Cheers

02-06-18 Gray card exposure - Gardening for Ordnance

Ted Nichols – Solarized Duotones

Posted in Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 28, 2016

Ted_Nichols_duotone-train

Copyright 2016 Ted Nichols

Ted Nichols has been bringing to the PhotoExcahange meetings the past couple of years experimental solarized duotone photographic prints from his wet darkroom. On some occasions he has scanned the prints and made some further adjustments in Photoshop. He had learned this unique photographic process from Edmund Teske during one of Teske’s many Los Angeles workshops, which were held until Teske passed away in 1996. Essentially a wet darkroom process using black and white (B&W) paper in conjunction with light flashing and processing chemicals that creates unique colors on B&W printing paper.

Nichols will readily admit that each print is unique because he has really tried to duplicate a print, but due to the total randomness of the Teske solarized duotone process, each B&W solarized duotone print is almost guaranteed to be one of a kind. And it usually takes him four or five attempts to get a print that looks acceptable enough.

Nichols also laments that the current B&W printing papers do not have enough silver content and it is getting harder and harder to achieve the effects he wants.As a result, he has learned to work fast in the darkroom, because with the current B&W papers, the visual effect is fleeting and you need to move the print quickly to the next tray to stop and hold the effect. So he is constantly on the look out for expired old B&W printing papers.

Editors note: Freestyle, located in L.A., has information on a Chromoskedasic Sabatier wet darkroom chemical for a process that can achieve somewhat similar effects.

Cheers

Ted_Nichols_duotone-pier

Ted_Nichols_duotone-abstraction

Ted_Nichols_duotone-horse

Ted_Nichols_duotone-train_version2